You and your children are always encouraged to be prepared and think “SAFETY FIRST!”

  • Look out for themselves and others.
  • Know what to think about before entering the water.
  • Know what hazards to look for and how to be safe in different aquatic environments, such as oceans, lakes, rivers, home pools and waterparks.
  • Know general safety guidelines.
  • Know how to stay healthy in the sun and the water.
  • Know how to help themselves in an emergency.
  • Know how to help others in an emergency, such as calling 911 and performing non-swimming rescues.
  • Know how to chose, properly put on and swim in a life jacket.
  • Parents who are educated about water safety can more safely supervise children around aquatic environments.
  • Parents who know what safety information their children are learning can reinforce the lessons with their children.

This equipment, sometimes called “muscles,” “wings” or “swimmies,” is used primarily for small children.  They may be useful for water adjustment, but they tend to reinforce a false sense of security in children who may not realize that the device is providing the flotation.  These devices often develop leaks and tend to slip off.  They raise the center of buoyancy and actually impair progress if participants become accustomed to kicking in a vertical position.

American Red Cross Safety Tips

The concept of water safety is a central part of our aquatics program.  Parents will feel confident that water safety is being practiced in all levels, and their children are learning good safety habits.

SAFETY TIPS

Longfellow’s WHALE tales

WHALE stands for Water Habits Are Learned Early

  1. Swim with a buddy in a supervised area.
  2. Be cool, follow the rules- know the reasons behind water safety rules.
  3. Look before you leap- choose safe places to swim and dive.
  4. Think so you don’t sink- know what to do when something goes wrong.
  5. Reach or throw, DON’T GO! - learn safe ways to rescue a swimmer in trouble.
  6. Don’t just pack it, use your jacket- know the importance of wearing a life jacket.
  7. Think twice before going near cold water or ice- knowing the hazards of cold water.
  8. Learn about boating before you go floating.
  9. Do your part, be water smart- know how to minimize water hazards around the home
  10. ALWAYS SWIM WITH AN ADULT!


*For more information visit: www.redcross.org/take-a-class/swimming/whale-tales/resources*

Suggested Books

These tips are designed for age’s kindergarten to 6th grade.

Inflatable Arm Bands

Styrofoam Floats

Styrofoam floats also called floatblets are attachable devices that come in a variety of shapes and provide enough buoyancy to support small children.  They can help build strength and endurance because children can typically practice longer in water over their head.  The disadvantages often outweigh the advantages as parents and children alike may become overconfident of the children’s ability and safety.  Poorly positioned devices can submerge children’s faces.  You should never depend on any artificial device for your children’s safety other than U.S. Coast Guard- approved life jackets.


I STRONGLY RECOMMENED AGAINST USING ANY TYPE OF FLOATATION DEVICES OTHER THAN U.S. COAST GUARD APPROVED LIFE JACKETS. I BELIEVE THEY INHIBIT LEARNING HOW TO SWIM PROPERLY AND INSTILL A FALSE SENSE OF SECURITY.